APES Daily Agenda


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AP Environmental Science Textbook (eBook) – Living in the Environment 17th Ed.


April 13th Announcement: Important Remote Learning Updates

Google Meet links are posted under the Class Code at the top of the Google Classroom Page

March 23rd Announcement: Important Remote Learning, AP Test, and Assignment Updates

Due to widespread school closures across the country, the College Board is changing the exam format for all AP Tests. They are developing a secure 45-minute online exam (for each test) that students will take at home on a computer, laptop, tablet, or cell phone with an internet connection. The test will not include any multiple-choice questions, just free-response questions that will measure skills that students learned in their AP classes. The full exam schedule will be available by April 3rd.

The AP Environmental Science exam will cover AP Environmental Science Units 1-7 and will not address topics 8 & 9. For this reason, you should not finish answering the review questions for Chapter 19 (Climate Change). If you completed the Chapter 19 Review Questions turn them in, you’ll get credit, if you didn’t do them, don’t, I’ll leave it blank in the gradebook so you won’t be penalized. I’m not giving extra credit for this, there’s more extra credit to come.

You do need to finish the Analyzing Evidence: Global Climate Change WS, because it focuses on graphical analysis and computations, which is a commonly assessed skill on the exam.

You will also need to finish writing the Climate Change Manifesto Paper. It will help you learn about climate change, which is of great importance in all of our lives, and writing papers is a big deal in college.

When you can, start the Chapter 18 Air Pollution review questions (due date TBD). Air pollution will be on the exam and it’s usually fairly-well represented.


Friday March 13th

Objective: Students will read, write, speak, and listen to interpret graphs of data that convey the impacts of climate change over the past century to analyze data and write a succinct summary on the impacts of climate change.

3-13-20, Warm-Up
Article: Climate Change Threatens an Iconic Desert Tree
✯Read the article, and as you read, create a bullet list that captures the main ideas.

Classwork: Global Climate Change — Investigating Evidence

Homework: See Calendar


Thursday March 12th

Objective: Students will read, write, speak, and listen to interpret graphs of data that convey the impacts of climate change over the past century to analyze data and write a succinct summary on the impacts of climate change.

3-12-20, Warm-Up
Article: The World’s ‘Third Pole’ Will Lose One-Third of Ice by 2100
✯Read the article, and as you read, create a bullet list that captures the main ideas.

Classwork: Global Climate Change — Investigating Evidence

Homework: See Calendar


Wednesday March 11th

Objective:  Students will watch the James Hansen Global Warming Ted Talk and write notes to use as a source in their climate change papers.

3-11-20, Warm-Up
Article: 2019 Was the Second-Hottest Year Ever, Closing Out the Warmest Decade
✯Read the article, and as you read, create a bullet list that captures the main ideas.

Classwork: Video: James Hansen – Global Warming – Ted Talk
-Global Climate Change – Web Activity – Google Classroom
-Climate Change Manifesto: Paper Guidelines

Homework: See Calendar


Tuesday March 10th

Objective:  Students will read and analyze a NASA Website about climate change, writing answers to questionsto use as a source in their climate change papers.

3-10-20, Warm-Up
No Warm-Up – Sub-Day – RMNP Research Conference

Classwork: Global Climate Change- Web Activity — Google Classroom

Homework: See Calendar


Monday March 9th

Objective:  Students will read and write, taking notes while watching the climate change documentary Before the Flood, to use their notes as sources in their climate change papers.

3-9-20, Warm-Up
NO WARM-UP

Classwork: DVD- Before the Flood — https://vimeo.com/190012126
Climate Change Manifesto: Paper Guidelines

Homework: See Calendar


Friday March 6th

Objective:  Students will read and write, taking notes while watching the climate change documentary Before the Flood, to use their notes as sources in their climate change papers.

3-6-20, Warm-Up
NO WARM-UP

Classwork: DVD- Before the Flood — https://vimeo.com/190012126
Climate Change Manifesto: Paper Guidelines

Homework: See Calendar


Thursday March 5th

Objective:  Students will demonstrate their knowledge and skills as they pertain to Chapters 15 & 16 to successfully complete the Chapters 15 & 16 Test in a timed setting that models the AP Environmental Science Exam.

3-5-20, Warm-Up
TEST – NO WARM-UP

Classwork: Chapters 15 & 16: MC + FRQ

Homework: See Calendar


Wednesday March 4th

Objective: Students will read, write, listen, and speak throughout the instructor’s PowerPoint Presentation that addresses energy efficiency and renewable energy to annotate notes, turn and talk, and participate in discussions, to be able to complete a written summary.

3-4-20, Warm-Up
Article: Damming the Lower Mekong, Devastating the Ways and Means of Life

Classwork
Notes & Lecture: Chapter 16 PPT- Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy: Hydroelectric Power, Geothermal, & Hydrogen + Smart Grid
Renewable Energy Video Clips:
-Valhalla The Concept: https://vimeo.com/165612944
-Energy 101: Geothermal Heat Pumps: https://youtu.be/y_ZGBhy48YI
-What is the Smart Grid?- https://youtu.be/JwRTpWZReJk

Homework: See Calendar


Tuesday March 3rd

Objective: Students will read, write, listen, and speak throughout the instructor’s PowerPoint Presentation that addresses energy efficiency and renewable energy to annotate notes, turn and talk, and participate in discussions, to be able to complete a written summary.

3-3-20, Warm-Up
No Warm-Up

Classwork
Video: PBS News Hour:  How these farmers are turning manure and food waste to power
Notes & Lecture: Chapter 16 PPT- Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy: Biomass & Biofuels + Hydroelectric Power
Renewable Energy Video Clips:
-Biofuels: The SWITCH energy primer: https://vimeo.com/40107508
-Energy 101: Algae to Fuels: https://youtu.be/IxyvVkeW7Nk
-Hydro: The SWITCH energy primer: https://vimeo.com/40107507
-Energy 101: Hydropower: https://youtu.be/tpigNNTQix8

Homework: See Calendar


Monday March 2nd

Objective: Students will read, write, listen, and speak throughout the instructor’s PowerPoint Presentation that addresses energy efficiency and renewable energy to annotate notes, turn and talk, and participate in discussions, to be able to complete a written summary.

3-2-20, Warm-Up
Calculation: Calculation: Off-Shore Wind Power

Classwork
Notes & Lecture: Chapter 16 PPT- Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy: Wind & Solar
Renewable Energy Video Clips:
-Solar: The SWITCH energy primer: https://vimeo.com/40112726
-Energy 101: Solar PV: https://youtu.be/0elhIcPVtKE
-Energy 101: Concentrating Solar Power: https://youtu.be/rO5rUqeCFY4
-Wind: The SWITCH energy primer: https://vimeo.com/40112725
-Energy 101: Wind Turbines: https://youtu.be/EYYHfMCw-FI

Homework: See Calendar


Friday February 28th

Objective: Students will read, write, listen, and speak, testing the effect of several variables on the power output of small scale wind turbines and solar panels to analyze their data and make connections to real world implication of wind and solar power.

2-28-20, Warm-Up
No Warm-Up

Classwork: Wind & Solar Lab

Homework: See Calendar


Thursday February 27th

Objective: Students will read, write, listen, and speak, testing the effect of several variables on the power output of small scale wind turbines and solar panels to analyze their data and make connections to real world implication of wind and solar power.

2-27-20, Warm-Up
Calculation: ICE, Hybrid, BEV

Classwork: Wind & Solar Lab

Homework: See Calendar


Wednesday February 26th

Objective: Students will read, write, listen, and speak throughout the instructor’s PowerPoint Presentation that addresses energy efficiency and renewable energy to annotate notes, turn and talk, and participate in discussions, to be able to complete a written summary.

2-26-20, Warm-Up
Article: Cash for Carbon: Schumer Climate Plan Would Help Consumers Buy Electric Cars
✯Read the article, and as you read, create a bullet list that captures the main ideas.
Classwork
Notes & Lecture: Chapter 16 PPT- Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy: Cars
Calculation: ICE, Hybrid, BEV
Technology: Car Shopping: Group Activity with Chromebooks and Chalk Board

Extra Credit:  Write an analysis of the candidates positions on energy and climate policy.  (20 points–Due Tomorrow Thursday 2/27)  Read the article below:
Article: Where 2020 Democrats stand on Climate change

Homework: See Calendar


Tuesday February 25th

Objective: Students will work in groups to record power (Watts), light (Lux), and temperature (degrees Celsius) of three different lightbulbs (incandescent, compact florescent, and LED) to determine which lightbulb is most efficient based on the data collected.

2-21-20, Warm-Up
No Warm-Up

Classwork
Lightbulb Lab: Intro + Lab Time

Extra Credit: Watch tonight’s Democratic Debate at 6:00 PM on CBS and write an analysis of the candidates positions on energy and climate policy.  (20 points–Due Tomorrow Wednesday 2/26)

Homework: See Calendar


Monday February 24th

Objective: Students will read, write, listen, and speak throughout the instructor’s PowerPoint Presentation that addresses energy efficiency and renewable energy to annotate notes, turn and talk, and participate in discussions, to be able to complete a written summary.

2-24-20, Warm-Up
Article: A major US utility is moving toward 100% clean energy faster than expected

Classwork
Notes & Lecture: Chapter 16 PPT- Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy: Energy Efficiency
Calculations:

Homework: See Calendar


Friday February 21st

Objective: Students will read, write, listen, and speak throughout the instructor’s PowerPoint Presentation that addresses Nonrenewable Resources (Nuclear Fuel) to annotate notes, turn and talk, and participate in discussions, to be able to complete a written summary.

2-21-20, Warm-Up
Understanding Energy Units w/Skeleton Notes
✯A typical coal-burning power plant uses 4,500 tons of coal per day.
✯Each pound of coal produces 5,000 Btu’s of electrical energy.
✯How many Btu’s are produced each day from such a plant?

Classwork
Article: Trump’s pledge to save US coal is failing, leaving coal country in crisis

Notes & Lecture: Chapter 15 PPT- Nonrenewable Energy Resources: Nuclear
NPR StoryNRC To Inspect San Onofre Nuclear Plant After Waste Canister Incident

Homework: See Calendar


Thursday February 20th

Objective: Students will read, write, listen, and speak throughout the instructor’s PowerPoint Presentation that addresses Nonrenewable Resources (Fossil Fuels) to annotate notes, turn and talk, and participate in discussions, to be able to complete a written summary.

2-20-20, Warm-Up
Article: In Colorado, a Bitter Battle Over Oil, Gas and the Environment Comes to a Head

Classwork
Notes & Lecture: Chapter 15 PPT- Nonrenewable Energy Resources: Coal
Video: PBS News Hour: The danger of coal ash, the toxic dust the fossil fuel leaves behind
NPR Story: Environmentalists Concerned That More Coal Ash Ponds Will Spill Into Rivers

Homework: See Calendar


Wednesday February 19th

Objective: Students will read, write, listen, and speak throughout the instructor’s PowerPoint Presentation that addresses Nonrenewable Resources (Fossil Fuels) to annotate notes, turn and talk, and participate in discussions, to be able to complete a written summary.

2-19-20, Warm-Up
Understanding Energy Units w/Skeleton Notes
✯The British thermal unit (Btu) is a traditional unit of work.
✯It is the amount of work needed to raise the temperature of one pound of water by one degree Fahrenheit.
✯The Btu is often used by energy utilities to measure natural gas and electricity production and consumption.
✯One cubic foot of natural gas supplies approximately 1,031 Btu of energy.  1 kWh of electricity is equal to 3,413 Btu.  How much natural gas would be needed to power the 1,450-watt microwave for one year?

Classwork
Notes & Lecture:  Chapter 15 PPT- Conventional  & Unconventional Natural Gas
Article: In Colorado, a Bitter Battle Over Oil, Gas and the Environment Comes to a Head

2-19-20
NYT’s Article: In Colorado, a Bitter Battle Over Oil, Gas and the Environment Comes to a Head
What is Proposition 112?
For: Against:
Summary

Homework: See Calendar


Wednesday February 12th

Objective: Students will read, write, listen, and speak throughout the instructor’s PowerPoint Presentation that addresses Nonrenewable Resources (Fossil Fuels) to annotate notes, turn and talk, and participate in discussions, to be able to complete a written summary.

2-12-20, Warm-Up
ANWR FRQ

Classwork
Notes & Lecture:  Chapter 15 PPT- Nonrenewable Energy Resources:  Unconventional Oil + Conventional  & Unconventional Natural Gas

Homework: See Calendar


Tuesday February 11th

Objective: Student’s will learn about the potential oil reserves in the Alaskan National Wildlife Refuge by watching the DVD- Alaska’s Last Oil, taking Cornell notes, to be able to, discuss the the following points in a free response question:

  • characteristics of arctic tundra and how arctic tundra can be damaged by human activity
  • activities associated with the development of petroleum resources
  • major uses for petroleum products
  • conservation measures that can reduce the consumption of these petroleum products

2-11-20, Warm-Up
No Warm-Up

Classwork: DVD- Alaska’s Last Oil w/Notes

Homework: See Calendar


Monday February 10th

Objective: Students will read, write, listen, and speak throughout the instructor’s PowerPoint Presentation that addresses Nonrenewable Resources (Fossil Fuels) to annotate notes, turn and talk, and participate in discussions, to be able to complete a written summary.

Objective: Students will read, write, listen and speak to complete skeleton notes and sample problems to be able to correctly complete energy calculations in both multiple choice word problems, as well as, free response questions.

2-10-20, Warm-Up
Understanding Energy Units w/Skeleton Notes
-Review Solar & Wind Calculation
-How much energy, in kWh, does a 100-Watt computer running for 5 hours use?

Classwork
Notes & Lecture:  Chapter 15 PPT- Nonrenewable Energy Resources-Conventional Oil & Unconventional Oil

Homework: See Calendar


Thursday February 6th

Objective: Students will read, write, listen and speak to complete skeleton notes and sample problems to be able to correctly complete energy calculations in both multiple choice word problems, as well as, free response questions.

2-6-20, Warm-Up
No Warm-Up

Classwork
Video: Energy (PBS)
Notes & Lecture: Understanding Energy Units w/Skeleton Notes

Homework: See Calendar


Wednesday February 5th

Objective: Students will read, write, listen, and speak throughout the instructor’s PowerPoint Presentation that addresses Nonrenewable Resources (Fossil Fuels) to annotate notes, turn and talk, and participate in discussions, to be able to complete a written summary.

2-5-20, Warm-Up
No Warm-Up

Classwork
Video: DVD Notes-Nova- Treasures of the Earth: Power
Notes & Lecture: Chapter 15 PPT- Energy Introduction & Nonrenewable Energy- Fossil Fuels
Video: Energy Defined, Putting Energy to Use, & Energy (PBS)

Homework: See Calendar


Tuesday February 4th

Objective: Students will read, write, listen, and speak to write a position statement pertaining to the permitting, building, and operating a large open-pit copper mine in the Sonoran Desert outside of Tuscon, Arizona.

2-4-20, Warm-Up
No Warm-Up

Classwork
Work Session: Should Rosemont Copper Mine be permitted? Position Statement (Low Attendance–Late Start–Snow)

Homework: See Calendar


Monday February 3rd

Objective: Students will watch the NOVA DVD-Treasures of the Earth: Power, taking notes in their notebooks, to explain, in a written summary, challenges we face providing power to a growing and technologically advancing population, in the face of climate change.

2-3-20, Warm-Up
No Warm-Up

Classwork: DVD Notes-Nova- Treasures of the Earth: Power

Homework: See Calendar


Friday January 31st

Objective:  Students will demonstrate their knowledge and skills as they pertain to Chapter 14 to successfully complete the Chapter 14 Test in a timed setting that models the AP Environmental Science Exam.

1-31-20, Warm-Up
TEST – NO WARM-UP

Classwork: Chapter 14 Test: MC + FRQ

Homework: See Calendar


Thursday January 30th

Objective: Students will read, write, listen, and speak throughout the instructor’s PowerPoint Presentation that addresses the Geology and Nonrenewable Mineral Resources to write notes, turn and talk, and participate in discussions, to be able to complete a written summary.

1-30-20, Warm-Up
No Warm-Up

Classwork
Article: Read the article, Are hybrid electric vehicles as environmentally friendly as we think?.  As you read, create a bullet list that captures the main ideas.
Notes & Lecture: Chapter 14 PPT- Geology and Nonrenewable Mineral Resources: Mining- Lithium, Coltan, & Rare Earths
Article: Read the article, What is Coltan?. As you read, create a bullet list that captures the main ideas.
Video: 60 Minutes- Importance of Rare Earth Elements.  As you watch, create a bullet list that captures the main ideas.

Homework: See Calendar


Wednesday January 29th

Objective: Students will read, write, listen, and speak to be able to describe the advantages and disadvantages of permitting, building, and operating a large open-pit copper mine in the Sonoran Desert outside of Tuscon, Arizona.

1-29-20, Warm-Up
1.Open pit mining can negatively impact the quantity of water resources in the region surrounding the mine.  Identify and describe one specific impact to the quantity of water resources in the region surrounding the mine.
2.Identify one type of air pollution generated by gold mining and explain one negative ecological impact or one negative human health impact of that type of pollution.
3.Describe one environmental impact of the remaining waste rock and tailings on the water quality of the region surrounding the mine (with respect to sulfur content) and explain a possible remedy.

Classwork
Chapter 14 PPT- Geology and Nonrenewable Mineral Resources:  Mining—Environmental Effects & Legislation
Articles: Should Rosemont Copper Mine be permitted?
+Position Statement

Should Rosemont Copper Mine be permitted?
Article #1 Rosemont, homebuilders would benefit from Trump’s proposed water rule change
Article #2 Proposed Tucson Copper Mine Threatens Habitat for Endangered Jaguars and Ocelots
Article #3 Manuel and Elías: Rosemont mine would bring devastation to Southern Arizona
Article #4 Stopping The Rosemont Copper Mine
Article #5 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosemont_Copper
Article #6 Judge won’t reconsider his ruling stopping the Rosemont Mine

Homework: See Calendar


Tuesday January 28th

Objective: Students will read, write, listen, and speak to describe data that justifies claims pertaining to the ecological impact of the coal mining method of mountaintop removal with valley fills.

1-28-20, Warm-Up
Which environmental law regulates surface mining of coal and surface effects of subsurface coal mining? What does the act mandates?
Describe the steps that should be taken to restore/reclaim the land.

Classwork
Chapter 14 PPT- Geology and Nonrenewable Mineral Resources: Mining—Environmental Effects
Video: America Revealed- Where Does Our Coal Come From- PBS (2012) Mountaintop Removal Movie from iLoveMountains.org (2006)
Article: Mountaintop Mining Consequences – w/Questions

Homework: See Calendar


Monday January 27th

Objective: Students will read, write, listen, and speak throughout the instructor’s PowerPoint Presentation that addresses the Geology and Nonrenewable Mineral Resources to write notes, turn and talk, and participate in discussions, to be able to complete a written summary.

1-27-20, Warm-Up
Acid Mine Drainage – Refer to your notes to answer the questions that follow.
1.What is acid mine drainage?
2.What is the “main ingredient” of acid mine drainage and where does it come from?
3.Write a chemical equation that shows how acid mine drainage forms.
4.Describe what happens in the reaction in terms of chemistry.
5.How does acid mine drainage cause heavy metal leaching and why is this a problem?

Classwork
Chapter 14 PPT- Geology and Nonrenewable Mineral Resources: Mining—Environmental Effects
Colorado Acid Mine Drainage Web Activity (Chromebooks — Google Classroom)

Homework: See Calendar


Friday January 24th

Objective: Students will read, write, listen, and speak throughout the instructor’s PowerPoint Presentation that addresses the Geology and Nonrenewable Mineral Resources to write notes, turn and talk, and participate in discussions, to be able to complete a written summary.

1-24-20, Warm-Up
Read the article, The Environmental Disaster That is the Gold Industry.
As you read, create a bullet list that captures the main ideas.

Classwork
Calculation: Problem Set #30: Gold Mining
Slides/Notes: Chapter 14 PPT- Geology and Nonrenewable Mineral Resources: Mining—Environmental Effects
Video: Ground Rules—Mining Right for a Sustainable Future

Homework: See Calendar


Thursday January 23rd

Objective: Students will read, write, listen, and speak throughout the instructor’s PowerPoint Presentation that addresses the Geology and Nonrenewable Mineral Resources to write notes, turn and talk, and participate in discussions, to be able to complete a written summary.

1-23-20, Warm-Up
Describe the chemical process that you used to extract copper metal from copper ore.
-Be prepared to share

Classwork:  Chapter 14 PPT- Geology and Nonrenewable Mineral Resources—Ore Formation, Mining: Extraction & Processing

Homework: See Calendar


Wednesday January 22nd

Objective: Students will conduct a lab investigation in which they process copper ore and extract the copper to be able to construct a written summary in which they explain (in detail) how the procedure that they conducted, to extract the copper metal from the copper ore, leads to environmental degradation when done on a much larger industrial scale, such as an open pit mine.

1-22-20, Warm-Up
Explain the relationship between pH and the solubility of metals.
Describe heap leach extraction (words) and the chemical process used to extract copper metal from copper ore (chemical equation).

Classwork:  Mining & its Environmental Impact:
-Intro/Demo-Lab Time (Steps #11-16) + Background Information + Analysis Questions

Homework: See Calendar


Tuesday January 21st 

Objective: Students will conduct a lab investigation in which they process copper ore and extract the copper to be able to construct a written summary in which they explain (in detail) how the procedure that they conducted, to extract the copper metal from the copper ore, leads to environmental degradation when done on a much larger industrial scale, such as an open pit mine.

1-21-20, Warm-Up
Read page one of the handout: Mining and its Environmental Impact: Lab and Analysis- Background Information

Classwork: Mining & its Environmental Impact: Lab and Analysis-Intro/Demo-Lab Time (#1-10)
+Background Information Questions

Homework: See Calendar


Friday January 17th

Objective: Students will read, write, listen, and speak throughout the instructor’s PowerPoint Presentation that addresses the Geology and Nonrenewable Mineral Resources to write notes, turn and talk, and participate in discussions, to be able to complete a written summary.

12-17-20, Warm-Up
Write a five-sentence paragraph.  Summarize what you learned from the of the Frontline Episode– “Alaska Gold-Bristol Bay & The Pebble Mine”.
Explain your opinion on the Pebble Project; do you think it should be permitted?

Classwork: Chapter 14 PPT- Geology and Nonrenewable Mineral Resources

Homework: See Calendar


Thursday January 16th

Objective: Students will read, write, listen, and speak to solve human population dynamics word problems.

12-16-20, Warm-Up
No Warm-Up – Set-Up Notebook

Classwork:  Frontline (DVD): Alaska Gold-Pebble Mine

Homework: See Calendar


Wednesday January 15th

Objective:  Students will demonstrate their knowledge and skills as they pertain to Chapter 6 to successfully complete the Chapter 6 Test in a timed setting that models the AP Environmental Science Exam.

1-15-20, Warm-Up
TEST – NO WARM-UP

Classwork: Chapter 6 Test: MC + FRQ

Homework: See Calendar


Tuesday January 14th

Objective: Students will read, write, listen, and speak to analyze, interpret, and explain a series of age structure diagrams (population pyramids).

1-14-20, Warm-Up
Which country or countries populations are:

  • Stable
  • Expanding slowly
  • Expanding rapidly
  • Declining

How do you know? Explain.

Classwork: Chapter 6 PPT- The Human Population and Its Impact
Age Structure Diagram Analysis- Hallway “Gallery Walk”

Homework: See Calendar


Monday January 13th

Objective: Students will read, write, listen, and speak to solve human population dynamics word problems.

12-13-18, Warm-Up
1.Identify and discuss two factors in a less developed country that could contribute to a decrease in fertility rate.
2.Identify and discuss two factors in a less developed country that could contribute to an increase in life expectancy.
3.Identify and explain two factors that account for rapid declines in death rates in industrializing countries.
4.Identify and explain two reasons why birth rates are high in developing countries and explain why birth rates are slow to decrease

Classwork:  Chapter 6 PPT- The Human Population and Its Impact
+Human Population Dynamic-Sample Problem Set

Homework: See Calendar


Friday January 10th

Sub-Day

Classwork:  Chapter 6 Review Questions

Homework: See Calendar


Thursday January 9th 

Objective: Students will read, write, listen, and speak to explain the impact human population on the environment.

1-9-20, Warm-Up
Read the handout “The Environmental Implications of China’s Growing Population” and answer the questions that follow:

  1. What is the population of China?
  2. What is the population of the United States?
  3. In what ways will China soon surpass the United States, in terms of consumption and pollutants.
  4. What step has China taken to limit it’s population growth and why is it so controversial?
  5. How did China’s fertility rates rank globally? What is China’s current fertility rate? How will this fertility rate affect China’s future population?
  6. Why it happening with China’s resource consumption and why?
  7. Describe the raw materials required and the pollution produced from the manufacture and use of a refrigerator.
  8. What’s the situation with cars in China and how will this impact air quality?
  9. In what area is China quickly becoming a leader? What is this a response to?

Classwork: Environmental Implications of China’s Growing Population
Chapter 6 PPT- The Human Population and Its Impact

Homework: See Calendar


Wednesday December 8th

Objective: Students will use the U.S. Census Bureau International Data Base to obtain specific demographic information, such as population by five year age groups, for their chosen countries to be able to construct an age-structure diagram and write a detailed analysis that reflects this information.

1/8/20, Warm-Up
No Warm-Up

Classwork: DVD Notes-Nova-World in the Balance: The People Paradox
The Power of Pyramids WS (Room 209-Computer Lab)
https://www.census.gov/popclock/world
https://www.census.gov/data-tools/demo/idb/informationGateway.php

Homework: See Calendar


Tuesday January 7th

Objective: Students will watch the NOVA DVD- World in Balance: The Population Paradox, taking notes in their notebooks, to explain, in a written summary, the nature of human population growth and the challenges we face as a result of this population growth.

1-7-20, Warm-Up
No Warm-Up

Classwork: DVD Notes-Nova-World in the Balance: The People Paradox

Homework: See Calendar